YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket
YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket

YMC Pinkley Hickory Jacket

$460.00 46000

Hickory stripes are part of the seersucker family, most notably from that lineage is the classic blue & white lightweight cotton used in warmer climates especially famous in the American south. Hickory has far more humble roots being a staple amongst the working class well before the prolifiration of the Levi Strauss Company's iconic denim coveralls. Hickory is most synonymous with American railroads, the stripe was actually first popularised by another workwear manufacturer at the time; Lee.

YMC took that iconic fabric, sourced an Italian version that uses a blend of cotton & linen to make for a more appropriate climate in the souther hemisphere & then garment dyed the lot for good measure. The jacket itself isn't the stereotypical engineers coat (that's choo choo engineer, not pocket calculator nerds) instead building a more contemporary cut. There's a whiff of railway in the pockets & collar but traditionally an engineer's coat is a bit longer in the body, with more pockets (gotta stash that pocket watch) plus the collars would often offer a bit more protection from the wind. It's similar to a Type I jacket but even then it's not really right to describe it as that. There's probably a reference out there that this matches up with but honestly who has time to work that out?

  • Woven cotton linen hickory stripe fabric
  • Elbow patches
  • Button waist adjustment
  • Custom branded donut buttons
  • Fabric made in Italy
  • Garment made in Portugal

 

Boxy fit, take your normal size.

Hickory stripes are part of the seersucker family, most notably from that lineage is the classic blue & white lightweight cotton used in warmer climates especially famous in the American south. Hickory has far more humble roots being a staple amongst the working class well before the prolifiration of the Levi Strauss Company's iconic denim coveralls. Hickory is most synonymous with American railroads, the stripe was actually first popularised by another workwear manufacturer at the time; Lee.

YMC took that iconic fabric, sourced an Italian version that uses a blend of cotton & linen to make for a more appropriate climate in the souther hemisphere & then garment dyed the lot for good measure. The jacket itself isn't the stereotypical engineers coat (that's choo choo engineer, not pocket calculator nerds) instead building a more contemporary cut. There's a whiff of railway in the pockets & collar but traditionally an engineer's coat is a bit longer in the body, with more pockets (gotta stash that pocket watch) plus the collars would often offer a bit more protection from the wind. It's similar to a Type I jacket but even then it's not really right to describe it as that. There's probably a reference out there that this matches up with but honestly who has time to work that out?

  • Woven cotton linen hickory stripe fabric
  • Elbow patches
  • Button waist adjustment
  • Custom branded donut buttons
  • Fabric made in Italy
  • Garment made in Portugal

 

Boxy fit, take your normal size.